Photography Tips Online HomepageBeginning Photography Tips
Forum Home Forum Home | Imaging | File Formats
  New Posts New Posts RSS Feed: explanation about RAW?
  FAQ FAQ  Forum Search   Calendar   Register Register  Login Login

explanation about RAW?

 Post Reply Post Reply Page  123 4>
Author
Message / View First Unread Post
green pixie View Drop Down
Newbie
Newbie
Avatar

Joined: 01 Oct 2009
Posts: 0
Post Options Post Options   Quote green pixie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: explanation about RAW?
    Posted: 01 Oct 2009 at 10:14am
Hi Can anyone help me a bit with RAW file formats, i've read and heard a bit about them but don't really understand if i should set my camera to this?
THanks
Back to Top
KTadmin View Drop Down
Admin Group
Admin Group


Joined: 19 Feb 2009
Posts: 178
Post Options Post Options   Quote KTadmin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01 Oct 2009 at 10:27am
Hi Green Pixie,
RAW files are just one way of several ways that an image file (your picture information) can be saved. You've probably heard of or are already using jpegs which is another type of image file format as is Tiff, EPS, PNG and many others. Jpegs compress the information captured in your image to make the file size smaller and therefore you have limited control over what you can do with the picture afterwards. A RAW file stores much more information about the picture captured and by using the right software (photoshop, aperture, lightroom) to edit your images you can usually get much more out of the image in terms of adjustments. For example if your picture had a large proportion of dark areas that you wanted to lighten it would be much easier to bring out the detail in the dark areas using the above software than you would of been able to do with a JPEG file. Basically you have much greater control over adjusting your image afterwards than you would have with other formats. The disadvantage is that RAW files take up more space on your memory card and computer (because they are bigger files) than a jpeg and you also need the right software to make the adjustments, although most cameras come with software that will allow you to make adjustments. As memory cards have got bigger and the software available has become cheaper it's not really a problem anymore. The only disadvantage is the time it takes to edit each image to get it exactly as you would like but if you are really keen to get the best out of your pictures then this is the way to go. And remember many SLRs allow you to shoot RAW and jpeg at the same time so you can use both.

Edited by KTadmin - 01 Oct 2009 at 5:14pm
Back to Top
Gilesy View Drop Down
Newbie
Newbie
Avatar

Joined: 24 Sep 2009
Posts: 0
Post Options Post Options   Quote Gilesy Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 24 Oct 2009 at 4:29pm
I've recently taken loads of shots on holiday and made sure all the images were in RAW. I was glad I did as it gave me the flexibility to adjust the white balance in Aperture afterwards which you couldn't do with a JPEG file. The pictures take up bigger file sizes but with the large memory cards available it's not too much of an issue.

If you want to take really large bursts of shots for action sports for example, it might clog up the buffer on the camera using RAW, so JPEG maybe better.
Back to Top
Pontey View Drop Down
Groupie
Groupie
Avatar

Joined: 17 Oct 2009
Location: UK
Posts: 71
Post Options Post Options   Quote Pontey Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05 Feb 2010 at 12:48pm
Hello everyone.

Good point karl could not have said it better my self lol

I always shoot in RAW i also recommend beginners to two, just like i did and still do lol.

The reason is what Gilesy says can make adjustments later I try to reduce the amount of adusting tho which makes me take more time in getting it right first time results in learning and taking better shots overall.
Back to Top
Dancing View Drop Down
Groupie
Groupie
Avatar

Joined: 13 Mar 2010
Location: Australia
Posts: 48
Post Options Post Options   Quote Dancing Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 25 Mar 2010 at 12:25am
Thank you ye all...what great information..I am totally new to the game as well ... once again thanks
Back to Top
jordimac View Drop Down
Newbie
Newbie


Joined: 08 Jul 2010
Location: El Masnou (BCN)
Posts: 0
Post Options Post Options   Quote jordimac Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 10 Jul 2010 at 12:11pm
By the other hand due to the RAW file is not an editabe format, this one is like the negative in a traditional photo.

If you make any edition of a RAW format picture you will can not save as a RAW file, but a TIFF, JPEG, etc, but not as a RAW. This is the reason that if you send a picture to a paper to be published, they want to see the RAW file in order to check that the picture has not been modified (as far as I know, in a newspaper you could process the photo, but not change it).

Regards.

Edited by jordimac - 10 Jul 2010 at 12:11pm
Back to Top
Indygnome View Drop Down
Newbie
Newbie


Joined: 14 Sep 2011
Location: England
Posts: 0
Post Options Post Options   Quote Indygnome Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14 Sep 2011 at 11:48am
Background to make my comments/questions more understandable - I like to take photo's, but dont edit, crop resize or alter them in any way at all. I dont own any photo editing software, and my plan is never to. I take my images from my camera and archive them straight away, keeping copies on 2 seperate drives to cover if one drive should die. I have just acquired a Nikon D90 and the camera is set to take both a Jpeg and a raw copy of each image. My intial reaction is to change this to jpeg only.

I am like the original poster, not too sure what Raw was. I had seen it mentioned many times and was unsure what use it was for me.

Soo.. If I read this thread right, Raw is basically an image format that has not undergone any compression or alteration by the camera itself and allows the user to transfer it to a computer and use more sophisticated software, such as photoshop to edit the image either more accurately or from a format that is not introducing inaccuracies in the process of creating the compressed image.

This leads me to think that the format is only any use if somebody intended to edit or alter the image in some way, or was going to allow somebody else to use the photo and alter it for whatever purpose. Am I right, or have I just not understood. What use would Raw format be to someone like me who doesn't process and an image in any way. Would i just be creating a extra large photo that takes up space that I would never touch because if I have understood correctly, Raw needs special software to view it.

Thanks in advance to anyone who replies. I appreciate the time taken to shed some extra light on this for me.

Edited by Indygnome - 14 Sep 2011 at 11:55am
Back to Top
horizon View Drop Down
Moderator Group
Moderator Group
Avatar

Joined: 06 Jan 2010
Location: Australia
Posts: 2414
Post Options Post Options   Quote horizon Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14 Sep 2011 at 10:48pm
G'day Andy,

Welcome to Karl's place, we hope you enjoy your stay.

You have a basic understanding of what RAW is, as a file format. However, if you were to take a photo in jpeg, and it required some editing, that was beyond what jpeg will successfully do, then RAW allows the data contained in the file to be edited to get the best from the capture.

If you want to try doing photo editing and but dont want to purchase the software, there are quite a few free photo editing software, such as gimp, that will do alot of what photoshop will do (not everything though), but it's free.

I personally dont see a problem with editing the raw file to correct exposures, etc, but making it unreal, thats were I dont go.

But in the end, whether you use jpeg, raw, raw fine, raw+jpeg, it's all up to you. It's your camera, it's your photo's, it's your choice. But be aware, jpeg has limitations when it coming to extracting that data in the file, in the event that at some time, you want to edit a jpeg, but the information is lost, because it's a jpeg.

Hope this helps.

Regards,
Craig
Camera's are tools, use what is right for you.
Please dont edit my photo's.
My Gallery
Back to Top
Indygnome View Drop Down
Newbie
Newbie


Joined: 14 Sep 2011
Location: England
Posts: 0
Post Options Post Options   Quote Indygnome Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14 Sep 2011 at 10:59pm
Thanks for the reply.

I have looked at a couple of free trials of software in the past and they aren't for me. I find photo editing to be just about the most boring thing I have ever tried, to the point where it put me off taking photographs for more than a year.

I will stick to taking them and archiving without touching them. Thanks for helping clarify things.
Back to Top
mcline View Drop Down
Newbie
Newbie


Joined: 28 Oct 2011
Posts: 0
Post Options Post Options   Quote mcline Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 31 Oct 2011 at 6:46am
I prefer jpeg because they tend to be a little more versatile and be more inclined to images that need to be altered after than those which only have a specific set of rules working good for them.

Though for ones needed to be zoomed without losing that much quality, eps images are one for the books. They do tend to occupy larger space but I really think that it is all worth it.
Back to Top
 Post Reply Post Reply Page  123 4>

Forum Jump Forum Permissions View Drop Down



This page was generated in 0.110 seconds.

FREE Photography Course: Start learning photography today with Karl Taylor's Free Photography Course.

Complete your photography knowledge with Karl Taylor Photography Courses.